Thursday, December 2, 2010

Day 2 of AishaOaktree's 21 days of YULE Blog Party

Each day for the next 20 days, I will be sharing  either some legends, myths, devotions, my own thoughts perhaps a recipe or 2 on my blog for Aisha's YULE Blog Party at By The Broomstick.
Please visit the other blogs that are participating(above)


I am still a newb, learning. Therefore any legend, myth, devotion etc. will be coming from someplace I read it, and I will be giving credit to the right people.

ADDITIONALLY, I have a small gift tree that has a some ornaments on it, but it also has 21 little gift bags or envelopes that are numbered 1-21.  Each day I will pick a winner from the comments for that day.  These giveaways are priced from $1-$5, and there are a few are like booby prizes...I am doing this FOR FUN!!

EASY RULES:
*be a follower
*tell me something about that day's post that means something to you, or touches you etc.
*list your name
*pick a number from 1-21*  (*each day obviously there will be numbers listed as OUT, it will be your responsibility to pay attention to each day's posts, to see the number that is no longer available)

Picture of gift tree not ready, will add asap
You can't see the gifts anyway, they are wrapped and in bags, or just there#s are in the bags or envelopes.   NO ONE from YESTERDAY picked a #, so I asked hubby to pick one and I could take it out of the running...that # is the #11....so pick a number between 1-21 except for 11.

Ok, now onto today's YULE post:

Welcoming the Sun Through the Ages:
Four thousand years ago, the Ancient Egyptians took the time to celebrate the daily rebirth of Horus - the god of the Sun. As their culture flourished and spread throughout Mesopotamia, other civilizations decided to get in on the sun-welcoming action. They found that things went really well... until the weather got cooler, and crops began to die. Each year, this cycle of birth, death and rebirth took place, and they began to realize that every year after a period of cold and darkness, the Sun did indeed return.
Winter festivals were also common in Greece and Rome, as well as in the British Isles. When a new religion called Christianity popped up, the new hierarchy had trouble converting the Pagans, and as such, folks didn't want to give up their old holidays. Christian churches were built on old Pagan worship sites, and Pagan symbols were incorporated into the symbolism of Christianity. Within a few centuries, the Christians had everyone worshipping a new holiday celebrated on December 25.
In some traditions of Wicca and Paganism, the Yule celebration comes from the Celtic legend of the battle between the young Oak King and the Holly King. The Oak King, representing the light of the new year, tries each year to usurp the old Holly King, who is the symbol of darkness. Re-enactment of the battle is popular in some Wiccan rituals.
Santa is just one of many legends of the Yule season.
© Getty Images

2 comments:

sophiadawn said...

The fact that the church found itself overlaying pagan rituals and days has always been fascinating. I remember reading some years ago some xtian authors trying to talk "good christian" people to quit celebrating Christmas because it is soooo pagan. This at the same time as other Christians talking about Jesus is the reason for the season. It doesn't bother me at all, I just find it amusing. I pick number 5. :)

Susan said...

Comments are closed for this post!! well you can comment, put the prize for the day was already chosen.

thank you

Susan